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The dual suns rose over the barren wasteland of the deserted planet. The already dry mudflats cracked further under the sudden heat cast upon them. Our ship, the Galactic Transport Excelsior model 3R400, touched down in a flurry of sand and charred weeds. The colonists, whom we were assigned to bring to this harsh environment, disembarked. Our captain stayed aboard to run diagnostics as the lieutenant and I assisted passengers as they removed their belongings outside the cargo bay.

From the ship, we lead the group to their designated yurts centralized near a large base station. The station was covered with corrugated metal. Power was run by vast solar panel fields that absorbed, not only rays from the pair of suns, but from their reflections off the base station walls as well. Everyone parted ways as they went to settle into their new homes. As I watched them walk away I heard a siren sound behind me and turned to see the lieutenant running back to the ship. I took off after him. I reached the bridge where I found the captain and engineer receiving orders from a hologram. The 3D image projected was that of the commander of the space station orbiting around the planet above our heads. He was ordering our ship to send our head engineer and computer technician up to him immediately. Their core was in a state of meltdown due to the influx of solar radiation not properly compensated for. A double solar flare had reached the station and fried the solar sensors located on the outer shell of the station. The commander was ordering our lead engineer and me to beam to the station right then.

The engineer and I donned our space suits and beamed up. The engineer stayed in the reactor room as I went outside the ship to check the equipment. I floated around the outer hull. I reached the solar sensors and, to my dismay, found that they were melted together in a blob of wires and metal. Right then, the core blew up in a white light that radiated from all around me. I was thrust violently from the ship. I grabbed hold of a satellite as I flew backwards. The shock wave from the implosion of the station’s core pushed me into the atmosphere of the planet. I watched as heat built up around me. I saw the metal of my satellite start to turn red hot as we plummeted. I used what force I had to push away from the melting projectile to try and push myself back out of the atmosphere. The shock wave was too intense. I radioed to the base station to beam me down before I burned up upon further entry. The captain received my message just in time and I was safely brought to the surface. I landed about 200 yards from our ship.

Before I was able to remove my helmet, I noticed an unusual amount of heat haze rising from the ground. The shimmer grew in size. I looked up and saw the atmosphere disintegrating before my eyes. The reactor core had shot radiation toward the planet causing the layers of protection from the dual suns to rip apart. I knew that, if the settlers were not brought to the base station, they would be roasted alive under the intense heat of the two suns. I started to run toward the base station. My boots became a hindrance and I could see the rubber of my soles melting as I stepped. The lieutenant ran from the ship toward the base station. I watched as his skin began to bubble. A distinct *pop* and *sizzle* met my ears. As quickly as his attempt at salvation began, it soon ended as he fell to the ground. His hair curled and fizzled away. His skin melted off his body and nothing more than a red, oozing form was left by the time I reached his corpse. I started toward the base station door but stopped. I watched the glass of my helmet warp as the shock wave from the core implosion hit the surface. I knew I would not make it to the door in time. I closed my eyes and waited for the end.

 

My dreams can be epic. It is hard for me to truly get them down when I dream them. However, if I can put them down before falling back into the world of my subconscious’ imagination, then you, dear readers, are in for adventure.

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